Old and New Lent.

 This year I have been lucky enough to be asked to make two very different Lent sets.

The first is a traditional Roman style with and old-gold look. The second is a more modern full gothic style with white and silver. Both sets use the same purple damask material but look entirely different in their finishes.

The gothic set uses a Celtic embroidery which, like many Celtic knots, uses a triangle pattern to represent the Holy Trinity. This is most appropriate as the parish I made this for is called Holy Trinity parish and this just happens to be the parish logo. It is wonderful to be able to personalise vestments in this way. This set was bought for the priest by a parishioner. In fact, they was so impressed they have approached a guild within the parish to fund further sets in the same style!

You will notice also on the back right down at the base there is a coat of arms. This is the diocesan shield for Edmonton, Canada.

The Roman style vestments have the IHS symbol which are not tied to any particular parish. This was bought by a priest in the UK. It is not unusual for priests to move parish, so this set will be appropriate for use in any parish he might visit, or be resident in.

Both styles start at around £600 depending on material and embroidery.

Are you interested in bringing beautiful vestments back into your parish? Please contact me for a chat and I’ll see what I can do for you!

Email Clare at: info@diclara.co.uk

And please visit the website: www.diclara.co.uk

0 thoughts on “Old and New Lent.

  1. Beautiful and elegant on both, keep up the good work!

    One pet peeve of mine though; the Roman or “fiddleback” chasubles are actually a more modern invention than the much fuller Gothic style. The Roman style gets called “traditional” because that’s what people remember from the years just prior to Vatican 2. I frequent the extraordinary form of Holy Mass and have seen both styles equally.

    I agree with St. Charles; the vestments should be full

    http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2008/02/styles-and-tradition-in-chasuble-of.html